Here Come The Social Issues

By

January 28, 2014

Today, Senate Democrats took advantage of their new “majority” by changing Senate rules and committee make up, after having won two recent special elections and holding the lieutenant governor’s tie breaking vote. The mid-session shake up is unprecedented. At one point, as the Democrats introduced a new rules package and erased the old ones, the President of the Senate, Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, said there were “no rules” in effect! Literal translation: The rules are what we say they are.

Consequently, there is no question that after today’s power grab, Senate Democrats will elevate their abortion and sex agenda to their top priority. Though some bills they introduced have already failed to pass committee, we expect, since no rules seem to apply anymore, for those bills to be revived and advanced. There is little doubt that “social issues” will dominate their agenda in the coming days, to the detriment of passing a state budget on time or addressing the dangerous health care issues faced by the implosion of Obamacare.

To ensure they’ll be able to defeat any legislation that protects vulnerable human life or advances educational freedom or parental rights, Democrats added an extra abortion apologist to their takeover of the Education and Health committee, while also creating a three seat (9-6)  majority. But in addition to stacking committees out of proportion to their “majority,” they did something not only unprecedented, but something beyond imagination.

In a too-late-by-three-years-response to being outsmarted in 2011, when they were an outright majority, and when pro-life advocates outmaneuvered them to add abortion center safety to legislation on a Senate bill amended by the House of Delegates, which forced a full floor vote on that bill, Senate Democrats today created a new rule where they can send bills they passed but amended by the House to the (new) Rules Committee. Normally, a Senate bill amended by the House goes back to the full Senate for a vote, and vice versa. Republicans argued that such a rule violates not only the spirit, but the letter of proper procedure, and indeed the rule of law. But ignoring the rule of law seems to be the normal operating procedure for some liberal politicians these days.

This afternoon’s often tense debate over changing Senate rules in the middle of that chamber’s four-year term did nothing but add fuel to an ever growing partisan fire here in Richmond. (What’s happened to The Virginia Way that so many liberals, trying to appear centrist, have clamored for?)

Regardless of one’s perspective on the validity of today’s power change, one thing is perfectly clear: elections matter. Democrats in Richmond hold power in the state Senate by just 11 votes; the number by which their 20th member won his recent special election. If there is a better example of why voting for candidates who share our values no matter the circumstance, we don’t know what it is. Democrats have power, not because they are winning more people to their views, but because people who share our views are not turning out on election day. In November, more than 70,000 fewer self-identified evangelicals voted in the governor’s race than voted in 2009. That decline in turnout made the difference in a close election.

At The Family Foundation, we are committed to reversing that trend. That’s why The Family Foundation Action, or political arm, has hired a full time political director to elevate our get-out-the-vote apparatus to levels we’ve never before reached. Today is a dark day for the Virginia Senate and for our values. But it is only one day.

Better days are coming.

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2 Responses to “Here Come The Social Issues”

  1. […] Here come the social issues […]

  2. […] well beyond even this session, ripping at the already stressed traditional Senate collegiality due to the unprecedented mid-session power shift. What followed left experienced General Assembly watchers saying they thought they “had seen […]

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